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Contributions to terrestrial magnetism, the magnetic dip or inclination. As observed at thirty important maritime stations, together with an investigation of the secular change in the direction of a freely suspended magnetic needle at twenty-nine of the stations. by G. W. Littlehales

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Published by Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Geomagnetism -- Secular variations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy G.W. Littlehales ...
Series[United States] Hydrographic Office. [Publications], no. 114
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC828 .L78
The Physical Object
Pagination45 p.
Number of Pages45
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6979389M
LC Control Number07001002
OCLC/WorldCa3208227

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Contributions to terrestrial magnetism, the magnetic dip or inclination. As observed at thirty important maritime stations, together with an investigation of the secular change in the direction of a freely suspended magnetic needle at twenty-nine of the stations. Contributions to Terrestrial Magnetism, the Magnetic Dip Or Inclination As Observed at Thirty Important Maritime Stations, Together with an Investigation of the Secular Change in the Direction of a Freely Suspended Magnetic Needle at Twenty-nine of the Stations Author: . IV. A contribution to terrestrial magnetism; being the record of observations of the magnetic inclination, or dip, made during the voyage of H. M. S. ‘Iron Duke’ to China and Japan, &c., MAJOR SABINE ON TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM. sponding to the observation. The eastern track in the northern Atlantic and the western in the southern Atlantic are those of the outward voyage in the Arrow. In the Archives of the Royal Society is an account by Mr. JAMES DUNLOP, Astro-nomer of the Observatory at Paramatta, of observations on the magnetic dip and.

An increased activity has recently been given to researches in terrestrial magnetism, with the definite object of obtaining correct maps of the magnetic phenomena, corresponding to the present epoch, over the whole surface of the globe. A Contribution to Terrestrial Magnetism; Being the Record of Observations of the Magnetic Inclination, or Dip, Made during the Voyage of H.M.S. 'Iron Duke' to China and Japan, &c., [ . texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Full text of "Contributions to Terrestrial Magnetism. No. Between the magnetic poles there is an area called the magnetic equator where inclination or the magnetic dip angle is zero; the magnetic field vector does not have a vertical component (Z) in this area. To the north of the magnetic equator, the north end of the compass needle points downward, both I and Z are positive.

The observation of the magnetic dip at sea, which was commonly practised by the distinguished navigators of the last century, was unfortunately not resumed when the interest in such researches was revived on the restoration of peace: but it is by such observations only that the lines of inclination can be independently traced over those large. Contributions to Terrestrial Magnetism () An increased activity has recently been given to researches in terrestrial magnetism, with the definite object of obtaining correct maps of the magnetic phenomena, corresponding to the present epoch, over the whole surface of the globe. magnetic field strength has higher values in this region. Magnetosphere The shocked solar wind plasma in the magnetosheath cannot easily penetrate the terrestrial magnetic field but is mostly deflected around it. This is a conse-quence of the fact that the interplanetary magnetic field lines cannot penetrate the terrestrial field linesFile Size: KB. 0. Introduction. The development of geomagnetic research in the 19th century is discussed in detail. Beginning with the Göttingen Magnetic Society, scientific activity developed under von Humboldt's influence and reached a peak during the First International Polar Year (–).Cited by: 6.